The Love of Emily Dickinson

I read the complete collection of Emily Dickinson’s poems as well as her letters to her sister-in-law, Sue – all while re-watching the AppleTV show, “Dickinson”. I was able to finish in line with the end of the third and final season, meaning that it takes about 15 hours to read through all of Emily’s letters and poems. I absolutely loved the show, specifically its wittiness and the juxtaposition of modern music with the vintage visuals. Reading her work of course gave me new insight, which made the show even more enjoyable.

The poems were edited by Cristianne Miller to be as Emily preserved them, which included 40 bounded collections that were called fascicles, as well as hundreds of loose and unbound poems. Emily was often known for her odd use of punctuation, indentation, and capitalizations, as well as her vivid imagery and philosophical themes. Her poetry is of course beautiful, but you need to know more about Emily to really understand the meaning behind her words.  

Emily was a misunderstood lesbian, or more accurately was likely bisexual, and was in love with her best friend, Susan. Both Emily and her brother, Austin, were interested in Sue, and of course this was the 1870’s so Sue and Austin got married. Despite their marriage, Emily and Sue remained close and their relationship had a timeline completely separate from their relationships with men.

In addition to her preserved poetry, Emily’s letters written to Sue were also saved. Many of Sue’s responses were not kept, however, due to a tradition from that time period to burn or get rid of certain items upon one’s death. The letters saved were very intimate and loving and proved that the women were romantically involved all throughout their lives.

What’s unfortunate is that their relationship was not properly portrayed after Emily’s death due to several reasons. Austin went on to have a very public affair after Emily’s death with a women named Mabel Loomis Todd, which deeply upset Sue. Sue busied herself with editing Emily’s poems, but was taking a long time and Emily’s sister Lavinia asked for the collection back. Sue handed them over, and Lavinia turned the collection over to Mabel Loomis Todd to edit. Mabel erased much of the connection to Sue in Emily’s writing, including ripping off pieces of letters to Sue to have Emily’s words appear as standalone poems rather than love letters.

For this reason, I enjoyed reading the book Open Me Carefully, which is the intimate collection of letters that Emily sent Sue (edited by Ellen Louise Hart and Martha Nell Smith). This included information about which poems had signatures and pieces torn off as well as background information on their relationship during different periods of their lives.

Their relationship did have rocky points, but remained a prominent part of both of their lives until their deaths. The most distance between them came after Sue and Austin’s marriage, when Sue became quite the socialite. She was hosting lavish parties with famous and up and coming literary icons, which would be the equivalent of Sue throwing celebrity parties. Basically, Sue became an 1800’s social influencer. Emily did attend some parties, but their correspondence decreased in frequency during this time period.

They never stayed apart for long though and Susan was with Emily upon her death. Sue even dressed her for burial, made the funeral arrangements, and wrote her a loving obituary that was published in the Springfield Republican. The rest of Sue’s life was left keeping a memory of Emily, which is a painfully beautiful end to a tragically poetic love story.

So here is to the immense love of Emily Dickinson and Sue Huntington Gilbert Dickinson. ♥

Thanks for reading.

What To Watch: Premium Channel Shows

Well, I made it an entire week working from home. I’m actually kinda enjoying it, except for the part where alllllll my plans keep getting canceled. Plans that we had paid money for and had been looking forward to for months… Yeah, some rescheduled over canceled, but still. If it weren’t for that, I’d really be loving the WFH life.

TV 1

Here is the last of this week’s “what to watch” series! Caution: these shows may require a subscription to more than just Netflix and Hulu.

euphoriaEuphoria – HBO
This show got lots of buzz when it first came out, and Zendaya is phenomenal in it. She plays a teenager fresh out of rehab with no intention of staying sober, and comes with quite a cast of colorful and rebellious friends. Grab your sparkle eye make up and dive in (if you have access to HBO of course).

dickinsonDickinson – Apple TV+
This is a creative and modern take on the story of Emily Dickinson, and I love the current music mixed in with the old time decor. Also love that Emily was a lesbian of course (or bi? TBD). Honestly, there’s a free one week trial for Apple TV+, which is more than enough time to watch the entire series, so I highly recommend following that route.

orphan blackOrphan Black – BBC America
Tatiana Maslany was put to WORK for this show – since she plays over 6 different clones. Each clone has her own accent, hairstyle, and attitude. And they need to work together to take down their makers. I think that this can be watched on Amazon Prime Video if you have access.

posePose – FX
I LOVE INDYA MOORE. And I would DIE to go to a ball in the NYC drag scene. This show is a wonderful moment for the trans, queer, and black community; POSE the house down boots! The first season can actually be watched on Netflix and season two should be added in May.

ShamelessShameless – Showtime
True to its name, this show is a Southside Chicago masterpiece. I’ve never been so intrigued by a family in my life (except the Kardashians of course!) I’ve also been told that my celebrity look-a-like is Emmy Rossom, who plays Fiona. Most seasons can actually be watched on Netflix, except for the most recent which is on the Showtime app.

TV2I may or may not do a few more posts of TV or movie recommendations next week, but this wraps it all up for now. Hopefully you have plenty of suggestions to keep you occupied during your social distancing.

Happy quaranTV!

Thanks for reading.